Activities For Kids With A Sensory Processing Disorder

Sensory processing takes place in the brain when it receives information from the body’s senses, processes that information, and decides how the body should respond. A child may have a sensory processing disorder if he or she does not process this information adequately, which can manifest in many ways, including a frustration or other stress response. All children can benefit from appropriate sensory experiences. Weighted items–including blankets, vests or weights like MightyTykes–can help kid with sensory processing disorder feel more comfortable and function better while doing everyday tasks. While sensory processing disorder can present some challenges, with sensitivity and some adaptations, we can still help kids be part of the action.

Children with a sensory processing disorder can help with preparing meals

There are numerous ways that children with a sensory processing disorder can be involved in meal preparation. Look for opportunities for your child to work his or her muscles such as rolling dough, carrying pots and pans, and stirring thick soups and stews. Seek out tasks that your kid will enjoy that are appropriate for his or her skill set and age level. For example, measuring dry ingredients for a cake or mixing is a perfect task for a preschool age child and can be done wearing MightyTykes.

Spending time in the water and going through an obstacle course provide ample sensory input.

Going to the pool on a regular basis can also be a positive experience for children with sensory processing disorders. Seek out activities for pool time that offer further benefits.  Since MightyTykes are waterproof, your child can wear them in the pool for gentle resistance and sensory comfort.

Obstacle courses provide ample sensory input while allowing kids with a sensory processing disorder to have a lot of fun. You can set up an obstacle course in your home or backyard or at a playground. If you have an obstacle course at a playground, consider incorporating swings, monkey bars, and tunnels. The motions required for these types of tasks will give the child feedback from the environment while improving hand-eye coordination.

Running errands and going to appointments can stress out children with a sensory processing disorder.

It is not uncommon for kids with sensory processing disorders to get stressed out about running errands in crowded stores or having appointments. These appointments can include getting a haircut or having a dental cleaning. Allow your child to wear a weighted item, such as a vest, hat, or heavy backpack to reduce stress level. Whenever possible, stick to a predictable weekly routine with minimal surprises. Again, experiment with different weighted items to help minimize sensory discomfort.

Keep in mind that not all sensory activities are appropriate for all children with a sensory processing disorder. Forcing a child who is extremely fearful or stressed out about a certain task may do more harm than good. Pay attention to your child’s reaction to different stimulation and seek out activities that meet his or her needs and preferences.

A special needs mom worked with physical and occupational therapists to develop Mighty Tykes. Our infant and child weights are intended to promote physical strength and stability for optimal development. Mighty Tykes address a range of common issues including one-sided weakness, overall weakness, toe-walking, low muscle tone or hypotonia, tremors, visual field cut, and sensory processing disorders. Our products are lead free, latex free, and made in the USA. To learn more, give us a call at (877) 456-2822 or contact  us via email at info@mightytykes.com.

YosuicoMT

YosuicoMT

President at MightyTykes
Soon after Isaac was born, Isabella Yosuico learned that he would have hypotonia, low muscle tone and weakness common to kids with Down syndrome and many other conditions.Like any mom wanting to help, Isabella sought a solution. She took a scrap of fleece and sand from the kids’ sandbox and whipped up a tiny pair of weights.
YosuicoMT

Latest posts by YosuicoMT (see all)

The following two tabs change content below.
Soon after Isaac was born, Isabella Yosuico learned that he would have hypotonia, low muscle tone and weakness common to kids with Down syndrome and many other conditions. Like any mom wanting to help, Isabella sought a solution. She took a scrap of fleece and sand from the kids’ sandbox and whipped up a tiny pair of weights.

Latest posts by YosuicoMT (see all)

MightyTykesTM is a registered trademark of Mighty Tykes, LLC.
©2015 MightyTykes, LLC. All rights reserved.
PO Box 193, Safety Harbor, Florida 34695.
info@mightytykes.com